Somebody hates His Job

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

I was browsing the site for the new Level Up! player content program and saw this:

Greetings, Level Up! Gamers! Level Up! acknowledges the fact that we have a very strong and creative community. We have seen your submitted work in the forums and we would like to reward your hard work and creativity by means of the Level Up! Player Content Program.

By submitting to this program, entrants hereby grant Level Up! a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty free, perpetual, transferable, assignable, sublicensable license to publicly display, publish, copy, reproduce, edit, modify, distort, use, utilize and otherwise exploit the submission in whole or in part in any manner now known or developed in the future, including, but not limited to, exploitation for commercial, business and trade purposes and for marketing, promoting and advertising Level Up! Inc and its related services. You further waive any and all so called “moral rights” or “droit moral” or similar rights that you may have in the submission.


Sounds like somebody's having a bad day at work.

(Cont.)

One moment you're being smoothtalked into submitting work for a few freebies and the next thing you know, you're being smacked in the face with corporate bullshit usually reserved for the fineprint, and in the words of my friend Ryan, "usually written with the same color as the page it's written on".

What was that all about?

Subtlety was never a fine point for Level Up! as I remember it, but this - this is just crazy. Who in their right mind would want to submit anything after hearing that? I know who who. Those who can't read and understand English. The clause is one sentence short of asking for your soul, intellectual property-wise anyway.

Now I'm not sure if this is the page author's way of warding off people who are knowledgeable enough in English without turning heads in management, or if the author is just too lazy to make a fine print, the way God intended those things to be revealed (tip: secretly), but the result is just fucking hilarious.

But you know what, I like it. It's honest.

They should start applying that sort of strategy for most of their disclaimers. It'd be a revolution in the corporate world.

Or maybe not.

2 comments:

Mai said...

The way they used "exploit" twice in the clause is already impressive. Such balls, such corporate balls.

soulassassin547 said...

Happens anywhere you deal with corporations, especially when there's legalese displayed.

After cutting out the legalese, it means: "whatever fic or art you made based on that game, once you submit it, that work will be ours and copyright-protected; you'll never earn a single cent from it."

 

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